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Follow along as we detail the method and technique behind our food.

Ramps

Ramps (Allium tricoccum) are a wild growing member of the garlic and onion family that are native to the north and eastern part of North America. They are the most coveted member of the onion and garlic family due to their resistance to cultivation, their ability to be used many ways in the kitchen, and to their short window of availability, typically about 4 weeks in the early spring.

Morchella esculenta and associated species, aka Morel

There is hardly anything that heralds the triumphant return of spring than the morel. This fungus is held in the highest regard by chefs and diners the world over. Graceful, intricate, strong, and timid I oft make the assertion that it is the Queen of fungi to porcinis status of King.

Koji-Cultured Venison Charcuterie

It’s late fall and that means that my friends who hunt are out harvesting wild game. This is one of my favorite times of the year to eat due to the fall hunt. Pheasant, rabbit, squirrel, and of course, venison.

Amazake Butter

Cultured butter is one of those hearty foods that sooths the soul and warms ones bones as the frigid grasp of late fall and winter starts to take hold. You could go to the grocery store and pay $8 for a 4oz piece or you could just as easily make 1 pound at home.

Mettwurst

I love fermented meat. This is a Mettwurst, a German spreadable sausage. The Italian n’duja, Spanish sobrassada, and German mettwurst all come from the same family of charcuterie; ground meats that are fermented, highly spiced, and spreadable when finished. 

House of Vinegar

House of Vinegar the book all about vinegar by Cleveland chef Jonathon Sawyer is now out in bookstores and online! Visit your local bookstore to pick-up a copy. Jeremy was one of the co-authors on the book.

Quercus spp. Oak trees.

These mystical towering giants hold a special place in the heart of humanity. We have relied on them as a source of fuel, timber, food, & spiritual inspiration for millennia. Myths about their life giving essence can be found from cultures as diverse as the ancient Greeks, the Celts, & the Sioux.

Grifola frondosa aka Hen of the Woods or Maitake

If smelling of mice, yes mice, looking like a pissed off hen, and being a parasite turns you off then you’re missing out. Not only is this fungus the true harbinger of fall but it is an anti-carcinogenic powerhouse.

Purslane – Portulaca oleracea

This plant reigns supreme when compared to all other leafy vegetables. That’s right the plant you mercilessly rip from your flower beds and toss in the compost pile is a Herculean überfood.

Hedgehog Mushroom – Hydnum repandum

This fungus is a real treat! Many foragers stumble on this fungus while looking for chanterelles. From afar I often think they are. Hedgehog mushrooms are mychorrizal with hardwoods & conifers.

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